Vampire

 

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As I did research on the Vampire, I found out that the tradition basically came from Balkan and Germanic areas. There is a direct connection between Witches and Vampires in Romania. The term ‘strigoi’ means Witch, but it became a popular term for vampires in certain regions. It was about this time that the church made the screech-owl into the Greek Demon Lamia. One of the best known symbols for Lilith was the screech owl. When they made it into the bloodsucking demon,Lamia, it stuck for superstitious religious people.(See Banshee) Where does all this blood sucking and drinking coming from? Stick around and you shall see.

 

In 1732 John Christian Stock’s Dissertio de Cadauverivus Sanguiugis was a result from a council of scholars getting together and showing vampires were a myth, created and upheld by Church-led-superstition. This didn’t stop the stupidity. Even unto the mid 1800’s people blamed all sorts of deaths, ills and infirmities on Vampires, making them scapegoats for any number of evils and misfortunes. Churches would literally dig up graves, decapitate the body, rip out the heart and burn it. My theory is the churches did this to steal the jewelry and other valuables buried with the person. King Solomon even did this.(See Patriarch Pharaohs) Vampire killing sets were being sold at this time too. Each one had holy water, eucharist wafers, a small pistol with silver bullets, a crucifix and a mallet.

 

 

What happened to give Vampires their romantic flair of today? Sir Francis Varney, a royalist supporter in the 17th century, started most of it. He gave the Vampire sex appeal, elegance and fangs. This is also the beginnings of the Vampires dislike for sunlight. He kinda did it in reverse and had the Vampire avoiding moon beams. In 1872 Irish lawyer, J. Sheridan le Fanu, wrote a short novel about a female Vampire named Camilla. Camilla became a Vampire because she had been bitten, slept in a coffin, had super human strength and was killed by a stake through the heart. Several writers took off with these themes and expanded upon them until the ultimate story of the vampire came out. This was Bram Stoker’s Dracula.
Stroker brought all the themes together and added more of his own. He is the first one to incorporate the vampire being able to turn into a bat. Most researchers say it is because of the vampire bat that we get this connection. The truth is the other way around. French naturalist, Comte George de Buffon, discovered the bat and named them after the vampire myth in about 1765. The key attraction to bats in the vampire myth is that they are creatures of the night. In 1927 Dracula was brought to London by actor and playwright Hamilton Deane. He introduced the black cloak in the play. From 1927 to 1931 it was brought to America and put on the silver screen and in plays all over the nation.

 

Where did Stroker get the name Dracula? We need to look to Transylvania for that. Just to let you in on a little occult knowledge, Transylvania is the place where a very ancient writing was discovered. This writing predates the Sumerian texts by more than 1000 years. This writing was practically identical to the Sumerian texts. Dracula comes from dracul which means ‘dragon’ and dracula means ‘son of dragon’. In Romania there were two princes named Vlad II, known as Dracul, and Vlad III, known as Dracula. Vlad III is often portrayed as a brutal tyrant that was harsh and ruthless. In Romania there are no such references. Vlad was defeated in war and the victors write what ever history they want. Vlad was part of a Transylvania Mystery School that taught ‘the secrets of nature, the language of animals, and all magic spells’. The church considered this the devils school. Vlad had his castle near Transylvania, but he was actually the ruler of Wallachia. He inherited the Society of Dragons from his father. This was the Dragon court of Ancient Egypt. It preserved old wisdom and was a place of work-ship not worship. Dracula was a champion of the peasant classes and his severities were always directed toward corrupt aristocracy and hostile invaders.

 

So where did the word vampire come from? Digging deep into ancient myths and legends I found a Druidic group that were in Transylvania. They were called the Oupires. They were the Upers or Overlords of the old Scythian race. This is where we get the word umpire in sports. Oupires were of the highest-bred priestly caste of the legendary warriors. They were a people of the goddess and had tattoos of Lemurs on their body. This very powerful Druidic group were followers of Kali, Vesta, and Diana. They had a 13 month lunar calendar because of Kali. Kali is where we get the name calendar. This group, like most matriarch ancients, drank the menstrual blood of the virgin priestess. The red robed fire maidens were the Scarlet Women. When ever you see Dew Cup of the Sangreal or Lily, they are talking about drinking menstrual blood. Menstrual contains high amounts of endocrinal secretions(this is where we get the word secret) which include melatonin. The males would drink this and their own hormonal levels would be increased, leading to greater powers of awareness, perception and general intuition. This process was called quickening. So there you have it. The males would drink the menstrual blood to get the power of the ladies. Before you gross out on me and think this is awful, what do you think Christians are symbolically doing? The true historical Jesus, Manu, was from a very strong line of females.(See his Royal Jesus) He did not try to get people to drink his blood, but he and his disciples more than likely drank menstrual blood. The writing that was found in Transylvania was this groups writing. It is why Transylvania is still the ‘capital’ of vampires. This Druidic cast had priests and priestess stay out all night and venerate the stars. Like all ancients they knew the zodiac was for getting in touch with the higher self and being in the dark caused production of melatonin. This is why vampires don’t like the sun.

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