Bowling

 

Where did bowling begin?  What does it represent?  Most will tell you bowing originated in Rome, but the game in Rome was more like Bocce ball.  The Polynesians had a game that the person had to knock down targets from 60 feet away.  These balls were small and could be thrown or rolled.  In reality bowling was invented in ancient Egypt.

In 1930, Sir Flinders Petrie, a very notable Egyptologist, discovered primitive bowling balls and pins while excavating tombs.  For this to be in tombs it had to be sacred.  The graves were from 3200 BCE.  The balls he found were stone or solid porcelain with finger holes drilled in them.  The pins were solid vases, that looked a lot like todays pins.  

In 2007 another prominent Egyptologist professor Edda Bresciani confirmed Sir Flinders Petrie’s findings when she discovered a bowling lane and bowling balls in the home of a Pharaoh.  Who knew Pharaohs loved bowling?  She even found a mummy holding a bowling ball in what looks like a modern day bowling stance.  There are also several hieroglyphs of male and female Egyptians holding bowling balls.  

As old as these finding are they would have been discovered in upper Egypt.  Egypt was not divided until Pharaoh Mam-aybre, the biblical Abraham, decided he wanted to rule lower Egypt at the beginning of the age of Aries which was about 1800 BCE (see Patriarch Pharaohs). There was still an upper and lower Egypt, but it was ruled by one Pharaoh.  Priests and priestess had a lot of power at the time too.    It is probably because of Lower Egypt that bowling was a forgotten game in ancient Egypt.  As you will see this game had to do with the Goddess and there is no room for Goddesses in patriarch religions.  

Many historians will tell you that bowling originated in Germany.  Germans carried kegels or clubs for protection.  When groups of people got together these kegels were sat on the ground and the Germans would try to knock the kegels over with a ball.  This was a religious game.  It was said the kegels represented heathens and whoever knocked over all the heathens was said to be pure.  Here lies the key to the answer why this game was played.  The patriarch Germans had it backwards.  Bowling was a game to honor the Goddess.  

Im not going to go into depth of all sports, but most have underlying meaning just like bowling.  The bowling ball symbolizes the Goddess.  In ancient Egypt a circle or ball represented both the feminine and the sun.  Usually when they were emphasizing the sun they put wings on it.  The bowling ball is the Goddess.  Putting holes in the ball for the fingers reiterates what it represents.  Sex was a huge part in the lives of the ancients.   To understand why this game was so important the to Egyptians here is a Coffin Text:

“I am Atum who created the great ones… I am these Two, male and female.”  

Atum is the one who masturbated to bring forth the cosmos.  

“Atum is he who…masturbated in On. He took his phallus in grasp that he might create orgasm by means of it, and so were born the twins She and Tefnut”.     

“Oh you great Ennead(the gods) which is in On(the cosmos or nature), Atum, She, Tefnut, Geb, Nut, Osiris, Isis, Seth, Nephthys…”  

This game is showing you how everything in the cosmos and yourself works.  The pins are phallic and the ball is feminine.  There are 10 because if you raise the On to a god(dess), which the ancients did, then there are 10 gods and goddess.  There are also 10 stages of ego.  With this they were showing that you had to use the sacred feminine to bring the ego to atonement.  Knocking down all the phallic egos with one ball gave you an X which was a symbol of 2 pyramids, one upside down and the other right side up.  Upper and lower Egypt.  If you got them down in two throws you got the leaning flail /.  The flail shows this game was made in the time of Taurus.  There is no crook in this game because it was made before the time of Aries.  Those that know my work understand why this is important.  

Bowling is showing that you are part of the On and all the gods and goddesses are within you and everywhere.  Use the sacred feminine to bring it all together.  It also shows you that you have to use the sacred feminine to over come the ego, which brings your life into harmony.  I’m sure the game was played very different than it is today, but next time you bowl hopefully you will see the game in a whole new light.  

6 thoughts on “Bowling”

  1. Very interesting article, GSerpent. It appears that, in all activities of life, even in their recreational times the Egyptians were always incorporating, remembering or practicing the importance of working on oneself to achieve and maintain balance and harmony with the world around them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Sunshamar. That is exactly it. They had to incorporate those things because we get off balance and lose harmony so easy. Because we have forgotten all of it we as a whole are off balance, which puts us out of harmony.

      Like

  2. Could you share your views on the subject: “Egypt knew no Pharaohs” only Kings
    Ashraf Ezzat has written an interesting book on the subject

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ezzat is simply wrong. He has done what so many other researchers have done. He can not find the truth, so he says it’s made up. That is lazy.
      Josephus even says the Israelites Kings were Lower Egyptian Pharaohs. Moses simply means ‘son of’ and his real name was ThothMoses or Son of Thoth. He did have several names, another Egyptian name was Osarseph , having to do with Osiris. Manetho says the same thing. Has Ezzat never read Josephus’ or Manetho’s work? How can a simple historian like me see this and not a so called professional historian? Calling something a myth and not real is not game changing. Several historians have said that, so how is it game changing? The exodus was real. The only game changing thing about it is that they were royalty being kicked out not oppressed slaves leaving. Until one excepts that they will never know the truth. The truth speaks for itself.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s